From Microfluidics to Nano-optics: Building Devices in the Montana Microfabrication Facility

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017    

Presenters: Prof. David Dickensheets, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and MMF Director at MSU and Dr. Phil Himmer, MMF Manager and MONT Primary User Liaison, MSU

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Webinar Description:

This webinar/seminar will offer an overview of tools and processes available in the Montana Microfabrication Facility (MMF). We’ll highlight several recent and ongoing projects, explaining the deposition, patterning, etching, metrology and packaging steps used in their fabrication. By watching this webinar, you should gain a broad overview of the MMF’s capabilities, the types of projects we support, and even examples of local users integrating processes from our NNCI partner sites into their workflow. We’ll also discuss how to get started if you have a project idea, the costs you should anticipate, and where to find more information.

Imaging Microoganisms on Surfaces

Date: December 7, 2016

Presenters: Dr. Philip Stewart and Betsey Pitts of the Center for Biofilm Engineering, MSU

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Webinar Description:

This webinar reviews the application of confocal scanning laser microscopy to image microorganisms on natural and engineered surfaces. At Montana State University, this capability is housed in the Microscopy Facility at the Center for Biofilm Engineering and is supported and made available to external users through the Montana Nanotechnology Facility on the same campus. A few examples of the types of systems that are accessible to fluorescence microscopy examination include topographically modified surfaces of indwelling medical devices, microfluidic systems, and interactions between microorganisms and particulates such as precipitated minerals or corroding surfaces. Laser scanning confocal microscopy is an invaluable tool for examining biofilms because it is non-invasive, three-dimensional, allows access to multiple features or activities through the use of a panoply of fluorescent probes, and can be performed on hydrated and living specimens. This seminar will begin with basic principles and operation of the microscope and the rationale for choosing confocal microscopy as an imaging modality. The concepts of working distance, resolution, immersion medium will be explained. How these features collectively determine the depth of specimen surface topography that can be examined will be addressed. The confocals available for use in the CBE facility are Leica TCS-SP5 upright or inverted microscopes, and both include 405 nm, argon-ion (458, 476, 488, 514 nm), 561 nm and 633 nm lasers for excitation. The choice of confocal and sample configuration used are critical to successful imaging, and the factors involved in making that choice, such as imaging penetration depth and objective working distance will be discussed in detail. How fluorescent stains and probes are chosen, applied and visualized as well as techniques to improve imaging with double and triple labeling will be examined. Application topics include the following: reflection mode imaging with fluorescence overlay, which is ideal for imaging hard or reflective surfaces with attached biomass; specialized sample preparation such as agar embedding; imaging curved or irregular surfaces; and time-lapse water immersion imaging. The seminar will finish with examples of quantitative and qualitative image analysis for confocal microscopy.


Material Characterization using electron microscopy and spectroscopy: Examples using SEM, XPS and Auger

Date: May 17, 2016.  

Presenters: Dr. Recep Avci Professor of Physics, Dr. David Mogk Professor of Geology, Montana State University.

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Webinar Description:

This webinar will introduce methods used to characterize materials (engineered and natural) using combined electron beam imaging and spectral analysis.  We will introduce the concept of using the right tool for the right job. Fundamental principles will be covered together with a variety of practical applications that will include examples of imaging of particles (size, shape, morphology), composition (using back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry), and surface spectroscopies to determine composition and chemical state of atomic monolayers on surfaces (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy). This interactive forum will encourage participants to explore possible future research collaborations. This webinar is being offered through the Montana Nanotechnology Facility (MONT), a project funded by the NSF National Nanotechnology Coordinated Infrastructure program.